Too much exercise?

With ears flying, Northwoods Vixen (CH Westfall's Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, 2011) shows plenty of speed. Photo by Chris Mathan.

Photo by Chris Mathan

Is there such a thing as too much exercise for a young dog?

Jerry and I think, yes, there is. So does Turid Rugass, Norwegian dog trainer and behaviorist.

“It’s a common misconception that energetic dogs need a lot of activities and exercise, but in general the rule is that too much physical training and activities doesn’t use up excess energy, but creates more of it, leading to stress.”

In addition, the more exercise a dog gets, the more it needs. When the excessive activity level begins at a young age, the pattern can carry into adulthood and the result can be a stressed-out, high-strung, wound-up dog.

That stress can manifest itself in a couple ways in dogs. Some can’t maintain a healthy weight despite the proper amount of food.  Poor digestion can lead to intermittent bowel problems.

We allow groups of puppies to spend half of each day in the exercise pens. They sleep as much as they play. Both rest and exertion are necessary for good health, mental stability and physical development.

Fenced-in back yards and invisible electric fences are wonderful options for dog owners. It’s easy to simply open the door and let a dog out. But it’s not healthy to allow it to free run all day.

As with most things in life—whether for people or for dogs—balance is essential.

Testing a new e-collar–the PE-900 Pro Educator

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The past couple months, I’ve been using a PE-900 Pro Educator training collar manufactured by E-Collar Technologies, Inc. I bought a one-dog collar but the PE-900 can be expanded to three dogs and features seven stimulation modes, including momentary and continuous, seven vibrations and four tones.

The cool thing is that these options can be programmed and combined in almost any configuration and can be customized for each dog. There are many other innovations—some quite complicated such as Level Lock and Boost.

For basic training in a defined area, the PE-900 is the best ecollar I’ve used.

Nice features.
My favorite capability is the patented “Instant” stimulation mode. It lets me use one hand to dial the intensity up and down while training compliance to known commands. The small increments of low-level stimulation help the dog make the right choice without causing the stress of hard corrections. This “Instant” mode can be applied for up to 45 seconds.

Another feature I like is the small size of the receivers. At only 2.4 ounces, they can be used on a very small or young dog.

For Whoa training, the PE-900 is perfect for use on the flank. The small bungee allows for a snug fit without inhibiting movement. (Houston’s Cappuccino, CH Shadow Oak Bo x Northwoods Chardonnay, 2014)

For Whoa training, the PE-900 is perfect for use on the flank. The small bungee allows for a snug fit without inhibiting movement. (Houston’s Cappuccino, CH Shadow Oak Bo x Northwoods Chardonnay, 2014)

E-Collar Technologies also improved another issue for me. When training compliance to the Whoa command, I use an e-collar on the dog’s flank. The collar must be snug enough to make contact with the skin but not so tight that it restricts movement. The PE-900 has a biothane buckle collar with an elastic bungee incorporated into the strap which allows a good fit with easy expansion and contraction.

Limitations.
The PE-900’s range is only ½ mile and I wonder if that could be further limited in dense woods or hilly terrain. Too, since I haven’t used the collar under actual hunting conditions I can’t vouch for its durability.

E-Collar Technologies is the brainchild of Greg Van Curen, co-founder and former president of Innotek. Another Innotek alum, Kim Westrick, is in charge of sales and customer service.

For more information on the PE-900 and other e-collars made by E-Collar Technologies, visit their website at www.ecollar.com.

Celebrating 20 years of breeding

Northwoods Chardonnay (Blue Shaquille x Houston's Belle's Choice, 2009)

Northwoods Chardonnay (Blue Shaquille x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2009)

What we think, what we know or what we believe is, in the end, of little consequence. The only consequence is what we do.
~ John Ruskin

It’s amazing and humbling to think about but 20 years ago today, on June 6, 1995, Betsy and I whelped our first litter. We bred a strong, blocky-headed, handsome black-and-white male English setter to a chestnut-and-white female. Even though she wasn’t pretty, she had a powerful combination of bird-finding and pointing instinct.

Finder's Keeper (RU-CH Pat's Blazer Banjo x Spring Garden Rose)

Finder’s Keeper (RU-CH Pat’s Blazer Banjo x Spring Garden Rose, 1991)

We never thought that 47 litters and 301 puppies later, we would have created a bird dog business that sustains and fulfills us. For not only did we produce lines of setters and pointers of which we are proud but we formed deep friendships with people from all over the country who share our love of fine bird dogs.

A. G. Murray, Jr., is an attorney and serious bobwhite quail hunter. A.G. and his wife Mary Beth drove from their home in Oklahoma to buy a puppy—a male they named Colonel—from that first litter.  Last summer, they again travelled to Minnesota to pick out their fourth setter from us.

~~~~~

Our first litter out of Spring Garden Tollway x Finder’s Keeper produced five males and three females. CH Blue Streak is in the upper right looking at the camera and CH Blue Smoke is in the lower center.

Our first litter out of Spring Garden Tollway x Finder’s Keeper produced five males and three females. CH Blue Streak is in the upper right looking at the camera and CH Blue Smoke is in the lower center.

The sire Spring Garden Tollway (Charlie) and dam Finder’s Keeper (Sparks) weren’t our first bird dogs. Charlie was preceded by a Brittany spaniel I purchased in 1980 but it was Charlie with his verve and tenacity that got me hooked on field trials. After buying Charlie in 1987, I was determined to find more good grouse dogs and spent the next seven or so years sorting through a dozen or more dogs—buying puppies and started dogs from the best dogs in the country. I hunted over them and then Betsy and I competed with them but not until we bought Sparks in 1993 did we find a match for Charlie.

CH Blue Streak (Spring Garden Tollway x Finder's Keeper, 1995)

CH Blue Streak (Spring Garden Tollway x Finder’s Keeper, 1995)

It was a gut feeling and also perhaps a bit of beginner’s luck but that first breeding of Charlie to Sparks succeeded beyond our expectations. It produced two field trial champions, CH Blue Smoke and 4XCH/4XRU-CH Blue Streak and, essentially, laid the foundation of all that followed. Out of Streak, we got Blue Blossom and Blue Silk. Silk produced our two best sires, Blue Shaquille and Northwoods Blue Ox, and out of those males, we have current dams Chablis, Chardonnay and Carly, and Grits, a wonderful male.

Blue Silk (CH First Rate x CH Blue Streak, 1999) and her sons Northwoods Blue Ox (by CH Peace Dale Duke, 2007) and Blue Shaquille (by Houston, 2004)

Blue Silk (CH First Rate x CH Blue Streak, 1999) and her sons Northwoods Blue Ox (by CH Peace Dale Duke, 2007) and Blue Shaquille (by Houston, 2004)

~~~~~

Blue Chief was whelped in our second setter litter out of Sparks by CH First Rate in 1996. Chief was a dream come true for me—a big, tri-color male with incredible instincts. Betsy and I learned early that Chief was a pre-potent sire and we found an excellent cross in Blue Blossom. In fact we bred Chief to Blossom three times, our first “nick.”

Blue Chief (CH First Rate x Finder's Keeper, 1996)

Blue Chief (CH First Rate x Finder’s Keeper, 1996)

Chief’s reputation grew and he became popular as a stud around the country. He sired 32 litters and produced 11 dogs that won 86 field trial placements. His contribution to the breed is still evident in championship-caliber setters such as CH Conecuh Station’s Pressure Test.

Kevin Sipple, a school superintendent in Wisconsin, bought Elle, a Chief x Blossom female in 2006. He brought her to a grouse camp owned by friends and shared with several serious hunters. Kevin has since purchased another female setter from us and now his five hunting partners have bought our setters, bringing the total number of Northwoods dogs in camp to nine.

~~~~~

CH Dance Smartly (CH Northern Dancer x CH Vanidestine's Rail Lady, 1991)

CH Dance Smartly (CH Northern Dancer x CH Vanidestine’s Rail Lady, 1991)

But Betsy and I don’t breed only English setters; we’ve carefully and selectively bred pointers, too. In 1997, we bred CH Dance Smartly, our liver-and-white female and first field trial champion, to CH Brooks Elhew Ranger. We kept a male named Dasher that Mark Fouts chose for Fallset Fate, his Elhew-bred female. Out of Dasher and Fate we got Prancer who produced Vixen, our current dam.

Bill and Gail Heig own Bowen Lodge on Lake Winnibigoshish in northern Minnesota. They offer grouse hunts to a select group of hunters and for more than 20 years, I have spent part of each fall working as a guide. Betsy and I will never forget the honor Bill bestowed on us in 1995 by placing the Minnesota Grouse Championship trophy Dancer had just won on the center of the lodge dining table.

Bill has bought many dogs—both setters and pointers—from us for use in his own guiding string. Over the years, guiding customers of his have become our clients and friends.

Northwoods Vixen (CH Westfall's Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, 2011)

Northwoods Vixen (CH Westfall’s Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, 2011)

~~~~~

Another pivotal litter was whelped in 2005. Dr. Paul Hauge is a dentist from Wisconsin who has long been involved in field trials and setters. Not only did Betsy and I campaign his excellent female CH Houston’s Belle but, with Paul, we planned and whelped Belle’s litters.

The sire of that 2005 litter was Gusty Blue, a grandson of our CH Blue Smoke. One of the female puppies was Houston’s Belle’s Choice. She became an exceptional producer, especially when bred to Blue Shaquill—our second “nick.” Choice’s genes, somewhere back in their pedigrees, are in every one of our setters.

Northwoods Grits (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2011) and his granddam Houston's Belle's Choice (Gusty Blue x CH Houston's Belle, 2005) had a good day in the grouse woods with owner Bob Senkler.

Northwoods Grits (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2011) and his granddam Houston’s Belle’s Choice (Gusty Blue x CH Houston’s Belle, 2005) had a good day in the grouse woods with owner Bob Senkler.

A later breeding of Belle to CH Can’t Go Wrong produced an uncommon litter. Every male that was given a chance to compete in field trials won, including RU-CH Land Cruiser Scout and two champions, CH Ridge Creek Cody and CH Houston’s Blackjack.

Betsy and I bred to both Cody and Blackjack but all three have been used as sires by other kennels around the country including Grouse Ridge Kennels, Skydance Kennels, Waymaker Setters and Erin Kennels and Stables.

~~~~~

Even though we focus on setters and pointers used in the pursuit of ruffed grouse and woodcock, Betsy and I are proud that our dogs are bought by hunters throughout North America and in Hawaii and Japan, too. Dogs have been used by their owners—some of whom are professional guides—to hunt most every type of upland bird whether in the woods, mountains and desert or on the prairie.

Northwoods Prancer (Dashaway x Fallset Fate, 2008)

Northwoods Prancer (Dashaway x Fallset Fate, 2008)

We are also proud to have produced 13 dogs that have won 23 American Field championships or classics with 16 runner-up placements. These titles have come at local, regional and national events, some with more than 80 dogs entered. Our dogs have won on grouse and woodcock, quail, prairie chicken, pheasant, sharptailed grouse and chukar partridge. They have won stakes in every age category and in walking and horseback trials. Importantly, our dogs have won for both the most experienced handlers and the least.

Our dogs have amassed a nice list of national and regional awards:
•    Micheal Seminatore English Setter Cover Dog Award
•    William Harnden Foster Award
•    Elwin G Smith Setter Shooting Dog Award
•    Bill Conlin Setter Shooting Dog Derby Award
•    5X Winner/3X R-U Minnesota/Wisconsin Shooting Dog of the Year
•    4X Winner/3X R-U Minnesota/Wisconsin Derby Dog of the Year

~~~~~

Northwoods Rum Rickey (Blue Shaquille x Snyder's Liz, 2012) and Northwoods G (CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013)

Northwoods Rum Rickey (Blue Shaquille x Snyder’s Liz, 2012) and Northwoods G (CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013)

Our earliest litters had one clear goal—to breed dogs that could win grouse field trials. But when Betsy and I formed Northwoods Bird Dogs in 2002, we refined our focus. Without losing the athleticism, flair, poise and polish required of championship-level performances, we wanted to produce dogs that had it all—smart, natural wild bird dogs with excellent conformation, superior instincts, wonderful dispositions and that were good-looking, too.

Now, 20 years later, Betsy and I are breeding the seventh generation of setters and fifth generation of pointers. What a rewarding, gratifying journey.

2015 puppies report: off to their homes

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Within the last two weeks, our English setter and pointer puppies headed off to their new homes. Puppy buyers drove to the kennel from Illinois, Michigan, North Dakota and Oklahoma and from various parts of Minnesota. Other puppies flew to new homes in Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, North Carolina and Oklahoma.

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It is 4:26 and Blackhawk has landed. Thank you for this opportunity.
~ Bill

For many of these families, this puppy will be the second they’re bought from us so it was fun for Jerry and me to see the first dog again and to spend time with these friends. Other owners are new to us and we enjoyed getting to know them.

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We love her already!! She is doing great and is a good girl. Sleeping in her crate without too much hysterics!! Now if we could just pick a name. Right now I am sitting on the couch with Rose sleeping on my lap and the puppy curled up to Rose. Progress!!
~ Laura

While it is a traumatic day for the puppies, they very quickly adapt. Within hours of getting to their new homes, they were inside cuddling on couches and playing on soft rugs or outside in the backyard.

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She arrived in perfect shape and was happy to see me. She is amazingly bright, obviously well socialized, incredibly friendly, non-stop playing and sound sleeping.  Neither Carol nor I recall a puppy that seems to have the smarts of a big dog in such a small package. She is a joy! We put her in a crate at night next to the other dogs and she goes right to sleep.
~ Bob

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2015 puppies report: three litters growing up!

Even though it means little, it's still fun to see a puppy's pointing instincts. Northwoods Louis Vuitton, male out of Northwoods Carly Simon by Nothwoods Grits, points the rag on a string at 8.5 weeks of age.

Even though it means little, it’s still fun to see a puppy’s pointing instincts. Northwoods Louis Vuitton, male out of Northwoods Carly Simon by Nothwoods Grits, points a rag on a string at 8.5 weeks of age.

It’s amazing how quickly eight weeks can fly by. It seems like yesterday that Jerry and I were up in the middle of the night, keeping vigil while Northwoods Carly Simon, Northwoods Vixen and Northwoods Chablis whelped their litters.

The Northwoods Grits x Northwoods Carly Simon litter of eight puppies at 7.5 weeks of age.

The Northwoods Grits x Northwoods Carly Simon litter of eight puppies at 7.5 weeks of age.

At first, caring for puppies is a breeze because the dam does all the work. She feeds them, ensures elimination and keeps her puppies and her nest clean. All we do is make sure the dam is healthy and that all puppies nurse and gain weight. It becomes messier and more work when we start weaning the puppies off the dams beginning at about four weeks.

The CH Rock Acre Blackhawk x Northwoods Vixen litter of nine puppies at 6.5 weeks of age.

The CH Rock Acre Blackhawk x Northwoods Vixen litter of nine puppies at 6.5 weeks of age.

This year, the trip from our winter home in Georgia back to Minnesota further complicated things but when the puppies were 5 – 6 weeks old and mostly weaned, it was safe for them to travel.

Now is the bittersweet time when puppies must go to their new homes. Many buyers come to the kennel to pick up their puppy. Some puppies arrive at their new homes by airplane when buyers live too far away.

The Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis litter of seven puppies at 6 weeks of age.

The Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis litter of seven puppies at 6 weeks of age.

Even though we’re always sad when puppies leave our kennel, we know they are embarking on their new lives. Equally gratifying, though, is seeing broad smiles on the faces and hearing joy in the voices of their new owners.

Fare well!

Northwoods Rolls Royce wins derby stake; continues family tradition

Winners and others gather after the Moose Rive Grouse Dog Club Open Derby stake. From left:  Tim Kaufman, Jerry with First Place Northwoods Rolls Royce, Judge Sig Degitz, Mr. Bjerke with Second Place Sadie, Judge Jason Gooding, Bill Frahm, Ben McKean and an unidentified youngster.

Winners and others gather after the Moose Rive Grouse Dog Club Open Derby stake. From left: Tim Kaufman, Jerry with First Place Northwoods Rolls Royce, Judge Sig Degitz, Mr. Bjerke with Second Place Sadie, Judge Jason Gooding, Bill Frahm, Ben McKean and an unidentified youngster.

The final spring field trial held on ruffed grouse was hosted by the Moose River Grouse Dog Club (MRGDC) on April 25 and 26 in the Douglas County Forest of western Wisconsin. At 14 entries, the Open Derby was the largest derby stake of the 2014-2015 season and perhaps the most competitive. The field included several dogs that had placed in previous derbies, in addition to the eventual winner of the Minnesota /Wisconsin Derby of the Year award.

Northwoods Rolls Royce placed first, followed by Sadie in second and Coulee in third place. Sadie is also out of our breeding—CH Ridge Creek Cody x Northwoods Chardonnay in 2013.

Royce is owned by Bob Senkler; I handled him.

Royce ran a mature hunting race and had a grouse find on which he was steady to shot. This was Royce’s second placement in three starts. Last spring, he placed first in the Minnesota Grouse Dog Association (MGDA) Open Puppy where he staunchly pointed a woodcock.

Royce’s placements prove that he matured early in his hunting application and his ability to point wild birds. He had extensive exposure, too, which helps. As a puppy, Royce was worked on wild bobwhite quail in Georgia and last fall he was hunted hard on grouse and woodcock. I used Royce often on guided quail hunts this past winter in Georgia.

Royce is out of the outstanding nick of Blue Shaquille x Houston’s Belle’s Choice (also owned by Bob Senkler) and joins a long list of siblings that have placed as puppies and derbies in grouse trials.
•    Northwoods Creek (owned by Randy Ott) placed first and second in two MGDA open derby stakes this spring.
•    Northwoods Troy McClure (owned by Dale and Jessica Robinson) placed third in the spring 2014 MGDA Open Puppy.
•    Northwoods Carly Simon (owned by Betsy and me) placed third in the spring 2012 MRGDC Open Puppy when handled by young Paul Diggan.
•    Northwoods Chardonnay (owned by Paul Hauge) placed second in the spring 2010 MGDA Open Derby when she was still a puppy. Chardonnay also placed in two spring derby stakes in 2011, enough to win the 2011 Minnesota/Wisconsin Cover Dog Derby of the Year award.
•    Northwoods Chablis (owned by Bob Senkler) placed twice in spring derby stakes in 2011 and was second place (by just two points!) to litter sister Chardonnay for the 2011 Cover Dog Derby award.
•    Northwoods Lager (owned by Jim Bires), a littermate to Chardonnay and Chablis, placed twice in derby stakes in 2011.

Chardonnay whelps six puppies by RU-CH Erin’s Hidden Shamrock

RU-CH Erin’s Hidden Shamrock (CH Ridge Creek Cody  x Erin’s Sky Dancer)

RU-CH Erin’s Hidden Shamrock (CH Ridge Creek Cody x Erin’s Sky Dancer)

Paul Hauge and Northwoods Bird Dogs have teamed up for another cool litter.

Paul has long been a partner with Betsy and me in our breeding program. His dog Houston became a foundation for our kennel and, over the years, we’ve bred many litters together.

Northwoods Chardonnay (Blue Shaquille x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2009) Photo by Chris Mathan, The Sportsman’s Cabinet

Northwoods Chardonnay (Blue Shaquille x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2009)
Photo by Chris Mathan, The Sportsman’s Cabinet

This winter we bred Paul’s Northwoods Chardonnay (Blue Shaquille x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2009) to RU-CH Erin’s Hidden Shamrock (Jack), owned by Sean Derrig. Jack is out of Sean’s female Erin’s Sky Dancer and Larry Brutger’s CH Ridge Creek Cody, which is also cool because Cody is by Paul’s multiple grouse champion CH Houston’s Belle to CH Can’t Go Wrong.

For a couple years now, I’ve been watching young Jack during training sessions with Sean. Jack is impressive and has nice wins—especially against pointers—on the all age circuit where Sean competes. He was runner-up champion in the 2014 National Amateur Derby Championship held on the Dixie Plantation in northern Florida and placed third in the 2015 West Tennessee All Age.

From what I saw, not only does Jack possess qualities we look for in a sire but he inherited quite a few traits from the Houston line.

Chardonnay whelped four females and two males on April 15.

Chardonnay whelped four females and two males on April 15.

This is Chardonnay’s fifth litter. She has produced exceptional dogs no matter which sire we bred her to.

On April 15, Chardonnay whelped four females and two males at Paul’s kennel in Wisconsin. All the puppies are sold.

News from clients…catching up…

Lulu (CH Can’t Go Wrong x CH Houston’s Belle, 2008) is so good in the grouse woods that it is embarrassing as Lulu finds every bird and has done so for years. Lulu varies her range naturally with the cover and if I am not hunting she know it and just messes around like a fou fou dog. She is most adaptable and smart. ~ Bob, Wyoming

Lulu (CH Can’t Go Wrong x CH Houston’s Belle, 2008) is so good in the grouse woods that it is embarrassing as Lulu finds every bird and has done so for years. Lulu varies her range naturally with the cover and if I am not hunting she know it and just messes around like a fou fou dog. She is most adaptable and smart.
~ Bob, Wyoming

Finn (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2014) turned 1 year old last week. He made his first trip to Upper Red Lake in December. We were about 3 miles out and he had fun slipping and sliding around all day.  ~ Todd, Minnesota

Finn (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2014) turned 1 year old last week. He made his first trip to Upper Red Lake in December. We were about 3 miles out and he had fun slipping and sliding around all day.
~ Todd, Minnesota

Izzie (CH Westfall’s Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, 2011) and Pal getting ready for the breakaway this morning.   ~ Jeff, Arizona

Izzie (CH Westfall’s Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, 2011) and Pal getting ready for the breakaway this morning.
~ Jeff, Arizona

Spent New Year’s on Sanibel with my parents. Kally (CH Can’t Go Wrong x Cold Creek Pearl, 2011) is my dad's constant companion/shadow and spends her days pointing geckos, ibis, pelicans, etc. She also goes fishing every time he heads out. She lays at Dad's feet when the boat is in motion and otherwise is at the front looking for birds. ~ Chris, Wisconsin

Spent New Year’s on Sanibel with my parents. Kally (CH Can’t Go Wrong x Cold Creek Pearl, 2011) is my dad’s constant companion/shadow and spends her days pointing geckos, ibis, pelicans, etc. She also goes fishing every time he heads out. She lays at Dad’s feet when the boat is in motion and otherwise is at the front looking for birds.
~ Chris, Wisconsin

It’s impossible to beat your pointers. Here’s Ginger (CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013).  ~ Wayne, Mississippi, hunting in south Texas

It’s impossible to beat your pointers. Here’s Ginger (CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013).
~ Wayne, Mississippi, hunting in south Texas

Allie (Northwoods Parmigiano x Northwoods Rum Rickey, 2014) is a very smart pup and very nicely mannered. We went through obedience class with my middle daughter and it was fun watching them interact. ~ Mark, Minnesota

Allie (Northwoods Parmigiano x Northwoods Rum Rickey, 2014) is a very smart pup and very nicely mannered. We went through obedience class with my middle daughter and it was fun watching them interact.
~ Mark, Minnesota

The old guys, Abbie (Gusty Blue x Houston’s Belle, 2005) and Sonny (Blue Chief x Forest Ridge Jewel, 2003), get it done. ~ Wayne, Mississippi, hunting in south Texas

The old guys, Abbie (Gusty Blue x Houston’s Belle, 2005) and Sonny (Blue Chief x Forest Ridge Jewel, 2003), get it done.
~ Wayne, Mississippi, hunting in south Texas

Scout (CH Houston’s Blackjack x Northwoods Highclass Kate, 2013), as an Easter Bunny, points a tweety. ~ Joel, Minnesota

Scout (CH Houston’s Blackjack x Northwoods Highclass Kate, 2013), as an Easter Bunny, points a tweety.
~ Joel, Minnesota

This week the woodcock arrived back in Duluth and Hartley (Northwoods Grits x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2014) took things to the next level! In total for the week, Hartley pointed 28 birds, 6 or 7 grouse and the rest woodcock. It was so fun to watch. It seemed like he learned something new with each bird he pointed. The hands-off approach is simply the way to go. The wild birds are teaching him everything he needs to know and it's easy to see there is no reason to interfere with that.  ~ Nick, Minnesota

This week the woodcock arrived back in Duluth and Hartley (Northwoods Grits x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2014) took things to the next level! In total for the week, Hartley pointed 28 birds, 6 or 7 grouse and the rest woodcock. It was so fun to watch. It seemed like he learned something new with each bird he pointed. The hands-off approach is simply the way to go. The wild birds are teaching him everything he needs to know and it’s easy to see there is no reason to interfere with that.
~ Nick, Minnesota

Training moments…make good use of them

Northwoods Parmigiano (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston's Belle's Choice, 2010) loves to "Fetch" his chew toy.

Northwoods Parmigiano (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2010) loves to “Fetch” his chew toy.

As a professional trainer, I’m always working with several dogs and want to make the most of my time with each. Whenever I interact with one—whether in the kennel, at feeding time, on the way to the truck or loading into the dog box—I try to teach the dog something.

These little snippets of time I call “training moments.” It’s amazing what can be accomplished.

Encourage “Fetch”
Every dog run has a wolf-size Nylabone Double Action Chew toy in its kennel run. When a dog likes to mouth or lick my hand, I pick up the chew toy and say “Fetch” as it grabs the toy or as I ease the toy into its mouth. I then lavish praise on the dog. Soon, when I come into their kennel run and say “Fetch,” the dog finds its chew toy and brings it to me. Several even anticipate my presence and pick up its chew toy whenever I’m close to its run. (Many dogs have actually learned “Fetch” this way.)

Don’t pull on leash
Day after day of many dogs pulling on the leash and jerking my arm led me to this idea. If a dog is straining against a lead, I stop and don’t move until it releases the pressure. This takes patience but it works.

Yoshi, an eager and energetic young English cocker, fully understands the training moment of "waiting until released."

Yoshi, an eager and energetic young English cocker, fully understands the training moment of “stay until released.”

Stay until released
It drives me crazy when I open a kennel door and a dog barges out. So I make the dog stay still until I say “All Right.” I open the door just a bit and when the dog makes a move, I shut it in their face.  With a few repetitions, they remain until released.

“Kennel” command and treats
A dog of any age spends lots of time going into crates so why not make it a pleasant experience? Sure, you can shove it into the crate but it doesn’t learn anything. Rather, I entice the dog into the crate with treats. At first, I toss the treat into the crate, making sure the dog has smelled it and seen it. Then I lead it to the crate with a treat in my hand and only give the treat after it is in the crate. (Purina Pro Plan Sport Adult Training Treats in Chicken Breast flavor are perfect. They are easily ripped into smaller pieces, smell great and fit into a pocket.)

These training moments are easy, simple and don’t take much time. Be patient and consistent and you, too, will be amazed with the results.

Final litter for 2015

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The last litter for 2015 is a repeat breeding of Northwoods Parmigiano x Northwoods Rum Rickey. These two setters have it all—looks, talent and temperament—and they pass it on to their puppies. Northwoods Mercury (above) is a male Jerry and Betsy kept from the 2014 litter.

Please visit Puppies for more information.


Dogs for Sale

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Three very nice young females—two setters and one pointer—are offered for sale. The setters were whelped August 2014 out of Northwoods Chardonnay by 2X National Champion Shadow Oak Bo and the pointer is out of the successful breeding CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen.

Please visit Started & Trained Dogs for more information.

 Spotted in the Owl Cafe, Apalachicola, Florida

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In a cozy corner of the bar that runs the width of the Owl Café, this sign was spotted. Besides the congenial atmosphere and fresh seafood, the choices of tap beer from The Oyster City Brewing Company located just across the street were quite thirst-quenching.

Good stuff about puppies

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A pointing dog’s first hunting season
Bird and gun introduction
Early development of puppies
How to correct a dog
How to pet a dog
How to pick a puppy
Patience and puppies
Picking puppies: the unimportance of picking order
Puppies and fireworks
Puppy buying mistakes
Raising puppies at Northwoods Bird Dogs
The pointing instinct
Training puppies on a stakeout chain

 

Good stuff from previous posts

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Finer points on...

A brace of bird dogs
Accuracy of location
Bird finding
How to flush grouse and woodcock
Hunting pattern
Range
Running grouse
Scenting ability
Speed and scenting
To point a bird, first a dog has to find it
Using grouse dogs on pheasants

 

Training

A bump or a knock
Backing point
Bird dog basics:  hunt, handle, point birds
Bumping grouse
Electronic training collars...a little perspective
How to correct a dog
How to pet a dog
Patience and puppies
The pointing instinct
Transition to wild birds
Unproductive points
WHOA and NO

 

Breeding

Dogs, not averages, matter in breeding
Evaluating litters
Pointers of Northwoods Bird Dogs
Proper conformation
The tail of a bird dog

 

Health

Bird dogs and hidden traps
Feeding bird dogs
Feeding for ideal body condition
First aid kit for bird dogs
Get your dog ready for the season
Hazards in the grouse woods
How to maintain a good weight for your dog
Quick lesson on poisoning and how to induce vomiting
Tick-borne diseases in dogs

Northwoods Birds Dogs    53370 Duxbury Road, Sandstone, Minnesota 55072
Jerry: 651-492-7312     |      Betsy: 651-769-3159     |           |      Directions
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©2015 Northwoods Bird Dogs  |  Website: The Sportsman’s Cabinet