Dog people vs. cat people

blog dog people puppy

The Washington Post recently published an interesting story, “What our cats and dogs say about our politics,” by Aaron Blake. Together with The Post’s Graphics Editor Christopher Ingraham and data from the American Veterinary Medical Association, Blake discovered a remarkable similarity between dog vs. cat states and conservative vs. liberal states.

In other words, the dog vs. cat map of the country looks much like the red vs. blue map of the 2012 election.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2014/07/28/what-our-cats-and-dogs-say-about-our-politics/

In a related piece on Wonkblog, Roberto A. Ferdman and Ingraham (who also previously worked at the Brookings Institution and the Pew Research Center) extrapolate further:

“We all know there are only two types of people in the world: cat people and dog people. But data from market research firm Euromonitor suggest that these differences extend beyond individual preferences and to the realm of geopolitics: it turns out there are cat countries and dog countries, too.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/07/28/where-cats-are-more-popular-than-dogs-in-the-u-s-and-all-over-the-world/

blog dog people roy

I don’t know the political leanings of many of our clients but, obviously, I do know that all are dog people. Further, a large percentage live with multiple numbers of dogs. While the initial intent was upland bird hunting, these dogs of our clients live, for the most of the year, as beloved pets.

Many thanks to my friend Jan Streiff for telling me about this story. She is a cat person but has grown quite fond of our dogs.

Puppy update #3

A sixk-week-old male puppy out of Northwoods Grits x Houston's Belle's Choice takes a break from his fuzzy chew toys.

A six-week-old male puppy out of Northwoods Grits x Houston’s Belle’s Choice takes a break from his fuzzy chew toys.

Jerry and I feel fortunate that for the vast majority of our 20 years of breeding, dams have gone into labor, whelped puppies and everything turns out fine. We’ve never lost a dam and very few puppies have died.

But some times things don’t go exactly right. On the morning of Friday, July 11, we knew CH I’m Blue Gert was in early stages of whelping her litter by Northwoods Grits but we didn’t see any contractions. We were concerned and, after a consultation with our vet, we brought Gert in. A cesarean section was necessary and six puppies—three females and three males—were delivered. But things were still tough. One male died within minutes of being born and the other two males died within 24 hours.

The all-female litter out of I'm Blue Gert by Northwo0ds Grits are lined up in a familiar pattern--legs and paws tucked underneath their bodies.

The all-female litter out of I’m Blue Gert by Northwoods Grits are lined up in a familiar pattern–legs and paws tucked underneath their bodies.

Thankfully, Gert pulled through surgery in good shape and is a model mother to her all-female, wiggly, vigorous litter. Two puppies are tri-color and one is orange-and-white.

A four-week-old male puppy out of Blue Riptide x Northwoods Carly Simon has a full tummy after his evening feeding.

A four-week-old male puppy out of Blue Riptide x Northwoods Carly Simon looks a bit scruffy after his evening feeding.

Across the aisle, Northwoods Carly Simon is still busy caring for her large brood of eight puppies, now about four weeks old. They were quite precocious in terms of moving about the whelping nest so we removed the divider and opened the dog door to the outside. Within minutes, puppies had scampered out the door.

It is fairly difficult to tell puppies apart in this litter as all are tri-color and have evenly marked dark heads, like both their dam and sire, Blue Riptide.

Dams are among the most patient of beings. This puppy found a comfy spot on top of her dam Northwoods Carly Simon. (Photo by Tom Beauchamp.)

Dams are among the most patient of beings. This puppy found a comfy spot on top of Northwoods Carly Simon. (Photo by Tom Beauchamp.)

At six weeks of age, the puppies are out of Northwoods Grits x Houston’s Belle’s Choice are the eldest and seem quite mature in comparison. They are completely weaned, eat dry dog food exclusively and drink water out of a big-dog water bucket.

Even though it's a squeeze, the Northwoods Grits x Houston's Belle's Coice litter still prefers the warmth of their littermates and the whelping nest bowl.

Even though it’s a squeeze, the Northwoods Grits x Houston’s Belle’s Coice litter still prefers the warmth of their littermates and the whelping nest bowl.

When evening chores are finished, Jerry and I take them out for short walks in a pasture of buttercups and clover or play with them on freshly mown grass outside the kennel. They are at their roly-poly-cutest now, all round tummies and white furry bodies.

English setter awards announced

Houston’s Blue Diamond (Houston x Forest Ridge Jewel, 2006)

Houston’s Blue Diamond (Houston x Forest Ridge Jewel, 2006)

The standings for the national English setter awards for all field trial venues were recently announced in The American Field. It was nice to see every dog honored but especially gratifying for Jerry and me was the inclusion of dogs that we bred. In addition, one dog Paul Hauge bred out of his Houston and one dog of Sean Derrig’s were honored.

2X CH Houston’s Blue Diamond, owned and handled by Ross Leonard, won the John S. O’Neall, Jr., English Setter Amateur Shooting Dog Award. Placing fifth in the standings was CH/RU-CH Houston’s Blackjack. He is owned by Frank LaNasa and Leroy Peterson, both of Minnesota, and handled by Frank.

Houston’s Blackjack (CH Can’t Go Wrong x CH Houston’s Belle, 2008)

Houston’s Blackjack (CH Can’t Go Wrong x CH Houston’s Belle, 2008)

For the fourth year in a row, Shadow Oak Bo won the John S. O’Neall, Sr., award in the open all-age category. Bo is the setter that famously won the National Championship in 2013 and 2014. Bo is owned by N.G. Houston and Dr. John Dorminy and campaigned by Robin Gates. Blackjack was high in that category also, listed seventh in point totals.

3X CH/RU-CH Ridge Creek Cody was the sixth highest point earner for the Elwin G Smith award. Cody is owned by Larry Brutger of St. Cloud, Minnesota, and handled on the circuit by pro Shawn Kinkelaar. Cody and Blackjack were littermates.

Ridge Creek Cody (CH Can’t Go Wrong x CH Houston’s Belle, 2008)

Ridge Creek Cody (CH Can’t Go Wrong x CH Houston’s Belle, 2008)

In addition, Sean Derrig had bred his dam Erin’s Skydancer to Ridge Creek Cody in 2012. A male he kept, Erin’s Hidden Shamrock, earned points in two derby categories.

Congratulations to dogs, owners and handlers. Perhaps, most especially, congratulations to Paul, who started it all with Houston more than 30 years ago.

John S. O’Neall, Jr., English Setter Amateur Shooting Dog Award
1st    Houston’s Blue Diamond
5th    Houston’s Blackjack

John S. O’Neall, Sr., English Setter All-Age Award
1st    Shadow Oak Bo
7th    Houston’s Blackjack

Elwin G. Smith English Setter Open Shooting Dog Award
6th    Ridge Creek Cody

Herman Smith English Setter Open All-age Derby Award
7th    Erin’s Hidden Shamrock

Bill Conlin English Setter Open Shooting Dog Derby Award
9th    Erin’s Hidden Shamrock

Erin’s Hidden Shamrock (CH Ridge Creek Cody x Erin’s Skydancer, 2012)

Erin’s Hidden Shamrock (CH Ridge Creek Cody x Erin’s Skydancer, 2012)

Puppy update #2

carly puppies closeup 2 wks 460

A lot has happened since my last update…

Northwoods Carly Simon whelped eight puppies in the early morning hours of June 24. Jerry and I were away but Dan was on hand to lend assistance as necessary. Much is even about the litter:  four have body spots and four don’t; all eight tiny heads are evenly marked; and sex distributions are even numbers (six females and two males). This litter is by Rodney Klimek’s handsome male, Blue Riptide.

Just hours after whelping, the eight puppies out of Blue Riptide x Northwoods Carly Simon barely take up half of the the heated bowl. Each weighs an average of .53 lbs.

Just hours after whelping, the eight puppies out of Blue Riptide x Northwoods Carly Simon barely take up half of the the heated bowl. Each weighs an average of .53 lbs.

At two weeks of age, the litter out of Blue Riptide x Northwoods Carly Simon fills the nest and spills over the edges.

At two weeks of age, the litter out of Blue Riptide x Northwoods Carly Simon fills the nest and spills over the edges.

The puppies are healthy and growing fast. On average, they have tripled their weight in two weeks—from .53 lbs. to 1.6 lbs.

Houston's Belle's Choice still does 100% of the work for her litter by Northwoods Grits at three-and-one-half weeks of age.

Houston’s Belle’s Choice still does 100% of the work for her litter by Northwoods Grits at three-and-one-half weeks of age.

In the next run, the four puppies out of Houston’s Belle’s Choice by Northwoods Grits are 3½ weeks old. They are active enough that we’ve removed the sliding door from the whelping next so now they can tumble out into their kennel run.  At four weeks of age, we’ll begin offering dog food (moistened and softened in water) and start the weaning process. In the meantime, Choice is still doing all the work.

As I write this, I’m Blue Gert (owned by Dave and Rochel Moore), is in the early stages of whelping. Last night her temperature dropped below 99 degrees and she’s showing signs of discomfort. This will be our second litter this year by Northwoods Grits.

The pointer puppies out of Elhew G Force x Northwoods Prancer are oblivious to the storm clouds approaching. They are far more interested in a mud puddle in the pasture.

Oblivious to the storm clouds approaching, puppies out Elhew G Force x Northwoods Prancer are far more interested in a mud puddle in the pasture.

Our pointer litter, Elhew G Force x Northwoods Prancer, turned eight weeks of age on June 30. Two are off to their new homes with the Fouts and Smythe families. We have the remaining two—a male we’re raising and developing for Rick Snipes of Texas and a female we’re keeping.

Puppy naming convention for 2014.
Many years ago, Jerry and I began a tradition of naming all puppies born in one year based on a theme. Not only did it provide some organization to our names, but it was easier to remember which litters where whelped when.

Some of our past themes include Beer and Wine, Cheeses, Rock Stars, Classic Cocktails, Luxury Cars. This year we’ve chosen the Periodic Table. Even though neither of us is a chemistry wizard, we like the concept of an orderly arrangement of all the elements. Plus, there are some cool words.

The first name for our orange-and-white female puppy whose orange is a very soft shade:  Northwoods Platinum.

Puppies and fireworks

blog puppies fireworks fort bragg 460

Friday is the Fourth of July holiday when our nation officially celebrates independence from Great Britain. From backyard to lakeshore to city-wide festivities, incredibly fabulous displays of fireworks will be part of the observance. While Jerry and I love a good show, we believe firmly that puppies and fireworks don’t mix.

We have heard many tragic stories of young dogs that were badly frightened—or worse—by loud fireworks. Puppies have become so scared that they panic, run away and are lost or hit by a vehicle. Others have chewed out of crates, sometimes breaking teeth and scratching until their paws are bloody.

Even if your young dog has been exposed to gunfire, you still need to be careful. Here are two easy precautions.
•    Put a crate in a protected, quiet place and put the puppy in it.
•    Provide background noise such as a TV or radio.

If your young dog will be exposed to fireworks, consider these actions.
•    Go about things normally during the fireworks. Act as though nothing special is going on.
•    Don’t comfort the dog or give it any attention. Don’t look at the dog; don’t talk to it; don’t touch it.
•    If your dog wants to be close to you, let it; but again, don’t comfort it. Comfort will most likely reinforce the behavior and make things worse

New York City

From top, credits for fireworks photos:
fortbragg.com
newyorktours.wordpress.com

The pointing instinct: clarification, information, problems and tips

Puppy points can be intense. Dixie (Houston's Blackjack x Northwoods Highclass Kate, 2013) is utterly focused on bird scent.

Puppy points can be intense. Dixie (Houston’s Blackjack x Northwoods Highclass Kate, 2013) is utterly focused on bird scent.

The excitement associated with seeing a dog on point is likely what attracted most pointing dog owners. What is the pointing instinct, exactly, and how does it develop?

The pointing instinct.
Pointing is defined as freezing at the scent or sight of game. It is an inherited instinct most prominent in the pointing breeds but, to some degree, many sporting breeds and wild animals also display the pointing instinct.

Two terms are frequently used to describe points.  Staunchness refers to how long the dog holds point while steadiness describes a level of training, i.e., steady-to-wing or steady-to-wing-and-shot.

Puppy points.
A puppy’s first points are usually an instinctive response to the smell of game. These points are often called “flash points” and are short in duration. Some puppies, though, do point for a longer time because they’re unsure and aren’t bold enough to rush in. During these early points, the puppy is in a heightened state of emotion, its body posture intense and sometimes crouched as it focuses exclusively on the smell.

As a puppy learns what it is smelling, it points and then stalks toward the location of scent until it gets close enough to flush the bird. The puppy chases to try to catch the bird. This continues until the puppy realizes it can’t catch the bird and, therefore, its only alternative is to hold point. As the puppy becomes more experienced in pointing, the excitement wanes and its pointing stature begins to convey confidence and boldness.

Puppy points aren't necessarily the prettiest...the important part is the instinct to stop.

Puppy points aren’t necessarily the prettiest. The important part is the instinct to stop.

Developing point.
To properly develop a young pointing dog, it should be allowed to learn how to handle birds without interference. The best method is frequent bird (wild or liberated birds that can’t be caught) contacts. Two of the most important lessons are learned at this stage—how close the dog can get to the bird before the bird flushes and that the dog’s movement causes the bird to flush. (For more information, please view the post Accuracy of location.)

There is nothing the handler can do—or should do—to rush this phase. While the puppy is pointing, don’t talk to or restrain it and don’t be in a hurry to flush the bird.

By the age of two, Northwoods Carly Simon (Blue Shaquille x Houston's Belle's Choice, 2011) was fully trained on steadiness--steady-to-wing-and-shot. On a Georgie quail plantation, she displays a quintessential pointing posture--beautiful and confident.

By the age of two, Northwoods Carly Simon (Blue Shaquille x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2011) was fully trained, i.e., was steady-to-wing-and-shot. On a Georgia quail plantation, she displays the quintessential pointing posture–beautiful and confident.

Staunchness and steadiness training.
At some time, and after enough bird contacts, most well-bred pointing dogs naturally stay on point until the handler arrives. This is the minimum expected (the hunter needs to be close enough to shoot the bird) and is referred to as a staunch point or staunchness.

The next step is steadiness training. Many pointing dogs are trained to be steady to the flush of a bird, also called steady-to-wing. Very few are trained to the ultimate level–steady-to-wing-and-shot.

Pointing problems.
Faulty genetics, improper development, bad training or a combination can cause problems with pointing.  Here are some of the most common and their causes.

Blinking
The dog smells the bird but then avoids it and continues on. This is almost always a man-made fault from improper development around game. While some dogs may be soft tempered by nature, no dog is born a blinker.

Bumping
Whether before or after pointing, the dog intentionally jumps in and causes the bird to flush. This is fine in a young dog but should not be allowed in a mature dog.  These are usually bold, aggressive dogs that need to be corrected.

Circling
The dog smells the bird and maybe points but then tries to move around the bird instead of going directly towards it. In a mature, experienced wild bird dog, this behavior might be a learned response to stop birds from running away from its points. Circling in a young dog, however, is more likely an inherited behavior but could be caused by improper training and development.

Flagging
The dog points the bird but its tail wags and never stiffens. This can be inherited and/or man made.

Laying down
A dog points with low posture or even lies down on point shows a lack of boldness towards the bird and/or doesn’t want the bird to flush. This can be inherited and/or man made.

Unproductive points
The dog points and but no bird is flushed. Again, this can be inherited and/or man made. (For more information, please view the post Unproductive points.)

The "wing on a string" trick is sure fun to see but means absolutely nothing.

The “wing on a string” trick is sure fun to see but means absolutely nothing.

Final thoughts.
•    Sight points are not the same as scent points. The old “wing on a string” trick so often used to pick a pointing dog puppy means nothing regarding future scent-pointing ability.
•    All dogs will tend to point longer as they get older. Too, they get more cautious in the presence of game.
•    There is “too much point” and “not enough point.” Ideally, the young dog will have enough genetic point to stop but learn staunchness through bird contacts.
•    A precocious puppy with excessive staunchness doesn’t always turn into the best wild bird dog in the end.

Pointer sisters

Northwoods Lexus, on left, and her littermate, Northwoods Audi, a nicely matched pair of pointers by CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen in 2013. Photo taken June 8, 2014, Duxbury, Minnesota.

Northwoods Lexus, on left, and Northwoods Audi, littermate sisters by CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013. Photo taken June 8, 2014, Duxbury, Minnesota.

This is the first entry in a new category Jerry and I titled “Photo Gallery.” No copy is necessary. The photograph tells the story.

Puppies and puppy news

Northwoods Prancer's active litter by Elhew G Force are now six weeks old. In fact, they're so active and playful that it's difficult to even snap a photo.

Northwoods Prancer’s six-week-old litter by Elhew G Force is so active and playful that it’s difficult to even snap a photo.

The Elhew G Force x Northwoods Prancer litter is now six weeks old. It seems that, overnight, they’ve turned into little dogs. No longer are they reliant on Prancer for anything but instead eat big-dog dog food and have moved into their own run with a big-dog dog bed.

Houston's Belle's Choice is protective but friendly while she expertly cares for her brood of three males and one female.

Houston’s Belle’s Choice is protective but friendly while she expertly cares for her brood of three males and one female.

On June 13, Houston’s Belle’s Choice whelped four puppies by Northwoods Grits. The three males and one female are all tri-color with mostly even-marked heads and no body spots. Choice is an excellent, seasoned dam and vigilant with her puppies.

At three days of age, the four puppies by Northwoods Grits x Houston's Belle's Choice look identical.

At three days of age, the four puppies by Northwoods Grits x Houston’s Belle’s Choice look identical.

Meanwhile, Northwoods Carly Simon moved into Prancer’s previous run and whelping nest. She is due to whelp her litter by Blue Riptide on June 22. First-time dam and very plump Carly is as cool as a cucumber.She has always been even tempered like her sire Blue Shaquille.

We can confirm that I’m Blue Gert, Dave and Rochel Moore’s grouse champion female, is pregnant by Northwoods Grits. She is due to whelp July 14.

Finally, we’re excited about another first-time dam, Northwoods Rum Rickey. She was bred to Paul Hauge’s ultra cool Northwoods Parmigiano. If all goes well, Rickey will whelp August 10.

How to maintain a good weight for your dog

Dog food gets delivered to us by the pallet. When the kennel is humming, we go through about one bag every two days. We feed Pro Plan Sport All Life Stages Performance 30/20 to almost all dogs--whether young, old, dogs in for training, puppies or nursing dams.

Dog food gets delivered to us by the pallet. When the kennel is humming, we go through about one bag every two days. We feed Pro Plan Sport All Life Stages Performance 30/20 to almost all dogs–whether young, old, dogs in for training, puppies or nursing dams.

It’s always disheartening when dogs come in for training and they’re overweight. Among other issues, they lack stamina and concentration and we immediately begin feeding them the proper amount to get them in shape. Just like people, dogs are what they eat and nutrition is key.

Betsy and I recently came across excellent information on the Purina Pro Club website about feeding and keeping dogs at a good weight and we want to share it.

Question answered by Purina Research Scientist Dottie Laflamme.

Question: How important is it to feed dogs on an individual basis versus simply feeding the amount of food suggested on the back of the package?

Answer: The feeding guidelines on a bag or can of food are suggested amounts to feed based on the average energy requirements of dogs. However, many dogs may need more or less than the amount suggested. If your dog is not very active, you might start with less food. If your dog is highly active, you could start with more food.

If you are starting a food for the first time and your dog seems “average,” you should use the guidelines to help you know how much to feed. Of course, if you are feeding other foods as well, such as treats, you should feed less. You should monitor your dog’s weight, then increase or decrease the amount of food offered to attain and maintain a lean body mass in your dog. If you do not have access to a scale, you can monitor changes by using a measuring tape to measure and record the circumference of your dog’s waist (just behind the ribs) and chest (just behind the elbows). These measures reflect body fat and will increase or decrease over time with weight changes.

 

We feed at about the same time every day. And we always measure!

We feed at about the same time every day. And we always measure!

Keeping Canine Athletes at a Healthy Weight

To perform their best, hardworking dogs must maintain an ideal body condition. Training activities, your dog’s metabolism and nutrition contribute to his body condition. It can be a challenge to keep weight on some canine athletes because regular exercise not only increases the calories an active dog burns, it also increases overall metabolism. Just like people, some dogs naturally have a higher metabolism.

“A dog that is losing weight, particularly muscle mass, is in a catabolic state and may be more susceptible to injury, illness or slower recovery,” says Purina Nutrition Scientist Brian Zanghi, Ph.D.

Intense training coupled with suboptimal nutrition, especially insufficient intake of protein, can cause a catabolic state. Since protein nourishes muscles, underweight canine athletes that do not receive adequate dietary protein may suffer from fatigue and inadequate recovery, which ultimately may impact their performance.

“If a dog is underweight, feeding a nutrient-dense food may help him in achieving a stable body weight and an ideal body condition,” Zanghi says. “If a dog seems fulfilled with his normal daily feeding portion, but still is underweight, feeding a food that is more nutrient-dense may help the dog ingest more calories with a smaller portion size.” This will help the dog get the calories needed before feeling full.

Dog food formulas that contain higher proportions of fat are more nutrient and calorie dense. Performance formulas with 28 to 30 percent protein and 18 to 20 percent fat will deliver more concentrated nutrition compared to maintenance formulas with 22 to 26 percent protein and 12 to 16 percent fat. For example, Purina® Pro Plan® SPORT Performance 30/20 Formula contains 30-percent protein and 20-percent fat to help fuel a dog’s metabolic needs and maintain lean muscle. It has omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil for healthy skin and coat and glucosamine to help support joint health and mobility.

“More important than enriched calorie content, the higher proportion of dietary fat in a performance formula helps ‘prime’ your dog’s muscles to better adapt to exercise and endurance,” says Zanghi.

Sometimes dogs that are underweight are not motivated by food, so it can be harder to get them to eat. Adding water or Purina Veterinary Diets® FortiFlora® as a palate enhancer to the dog’s food can stimulate a greater desire to eat, particularly when traveling or boarded in a kennel.

If a dog is routinely eating twice a day, it may be helpful to switch to once a day, such as after the dog is done exercising or training for the day. His post-workout appetite may improve his ingestion volume. You also should consider whether the dominant behavior of other dogs in the home or kennel may prevent access to food and thus contribute to a dog’s underweight condition. Feeding dogs in separate locations may correct the problem.

Evaluating Your Dog
When it comes to assessing your dog’s body condition, you need to know more than just a number on a scale.

“A dog’s scale body weight tells us nothing about the amount of body fat relative to muscle mass,” Zanghi explains.

By noting some simple features of your dog’s body, you can make a general assessment of his body condition and monitor his body fat. Dogs that are overweight are more susceptible to joint-related health concerns as added weight places extra stress on the joints of an active dog.

Purina veterinary nutritionists developed the nine-point Purina Body Condition System.

Typically, dogs with an ideal body condition of 4 or 5 score should have:
•    An obvious waist behind the ribs when viewed from above
•    A tuck in the belly when viewed from the side
•    Ribs that are easily felt but not seen

To determine your dog’s body condition score, examine his physique by putting your hands on the dog and feeling his ribs. Place both thumbs on the dog’s backbone and spread your hands across the rib cage. You should be able to easily feel the ribs. You also should be able to view the dog’s waist behind the ribs, and an abdominal tuck should be apparent from the side. This is a convenient way to monitor your dog throughout the seasons to know if you should be adjusting your dog’s daily food portion to meet his caloric needs.

Monitoring your dog’s body condition and feeding a high-quality, nutrient-dense food will help ensure your canine athlete is performing at his best.

blog sidebar rae 250

Northwoods Ferrari for sale

Ferrari is a 16-month-old female out of CH Ridge Creek Cody x Northwoods Chardonnay. She has been hunted on ruffed grouse and woodcock in Minnesota and trained on wild bobwhite quail in Georgia. She is polished on WHOA in the yard both verbally and with ecollar stimulation. In addition, she has a want-to-please attitude that is a pleasure to work with.

Ferrari is very attractive in motion with her long, strong, easy stride. She has a friendly, calm disposition and is well socialized with people and dogs.

Ferrari is a Started Dog. Please visit Started and Trained Dogs for Sale and contact Jerry and Betsy for more information.

 Good stuff from previous posts


blog sidebar prancer

Puppies

Early development of puppies
How to pick a puppy
Puppies and fireworks
Puppy buying mistakes
Raising puppies at Northwoods Bird Dogs

 

Finer points on...

A brace of bird dogs
Accuracy of location
Bird finding
Range
Running grouse
Scenting ability
Speed and scenting

 

Training

A bump or a knock
Backing point
Bird dog basics:  hunt, handle, point birds
Bumping grouse & helpful tips
How to correct a dog
How to pet a dog
Patience
Transition to wild birds
Unproductive points
WHOA and NO

 

Breeding

Pointers of Northwoods Bird Dogs
Proper conformation
The tail of a bird dog

 

Health

Feeding bird dogs
Feeding for ideal body condition
First aid kit for bird dogs
Get your dog ready for the season
Hazards in the grouse woods
Tick-borne diseases in dogs

Northwoods Birds Dogs    53370 Duxbury Road, Sandstone, Minnesota 55072
Jerry: 651-492-7312     |      Betsy: 651-769-3159     |           |      Directions
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