Georgia 2014: February training report and photo album

Meg (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) points with exceptional poise in mixed cover at Arrowhead Farms.

Meg (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) points with exceptional poise in mixed cover at Arrowhead Farms.

Wet from morning dew, Chardonnay (Blue Shaquille x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2009) nails a covey in heavy cover on the Miami Plantation.

Wet from morning dew, Chardonnay (Blue Shaquille x Houston’s Belle’s Choice, 2009) nails a covey in heavy cover on the Miami Plantation.

Grace (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle Choice, 2010) and Grits (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2011), in front, and Franny (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle, 2010) and Ox (Peace Dale Duke x Blue Silk, 2007) are tired, wet and happy after a conditioning run on a pine-needle-strewn road.

Grace (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle Choice, 2010) and Grits (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2011), in front, and Franny (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle, 2010) and Ox (Peace Dale Duke x Blue Silk, 2007) are tired, wet and happy after a conditioning run on a pine-needle-strewn road.

In his fluffy puppy coat, Jack (Houston’s Blackjack x Northwoods Highclass Kate, 2013) points with composure and high head.

In his fluffy puppy coat, Jack (Houston’s Blackjack x Northwoods Highclass Kate, 2013) points with composure and high head.

The pointer Pesto (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) and the horse Willow take a break in tall broom sedge on the Disston Plantation.

The pointer Pesto (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) and the horse Willow take a break in tall broom sedge on the Miami Plantation.

On an exciting late afternoon training session, Gert (I’m Houston’s Image x Blue Silk, 2006) is backed by Ox (Peace Dale Dule x Blue Silk, 2007) on a field edge where Jerry and I have found quail countless times.

On an exciting late afternoon training session, Gert (I’m Houston’s Image x Blue Silk, 2006) is backed by Ox (Peace Dale Dule x Blue Silk, 2007) on a field edge where Jerry and I have found quail countless times.

Ben McKean flushes for his setter Franny (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle, 2010) on the Miami Plantation

Ben McKean flushes for his setter Franny (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle, 2010) on the Miami Plantation.

In thick, nasty cover on the Miami Plantation, Sean (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle Choice, 2010) backs the pointer Joe.

In thick, nasty cover on the Miami Plantation, Sean (Northwoods Blue Ox x Houston’s Belle Choice, 2010) backs the pointer Joe.

Earnestly and intensely, Kiah (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) points a single quail in broom sedge on Arrowhead Farms.

Earnestly and intensely, Kiah (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) points a single quail in broom sedge on Arrowhead Farms.

On the Disston Plantation, young Axel (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2012) backs an experienced pointer.

On the Disston Plantation, young Axel (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2012) backs an experienced pointer.

With one front leg lifted and poker straight tail, pointer Buddy points a single quail on an open hillside of Arrowhead Farms.

With one front leg lifted and poker straight tail, pointer Buddy points a single quail on an open hillside of Arrowhead Farms.

Northwoods Grits (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2011) points a covey in beautiful cover on the Miami Plantation.

Northwoods Grits (Northwoods Blue Ox x Northwoods Chablis, 2011) points a covey in beautiful cover on the Miami Plantation.

Tripp (Houston x Northwoods Blue Babe, 2009) backs another setter during a late afternoon hunt on the Trinity Place Plantation.

Tripp (Houston x Northwoods Blue Babe, 2009) backs another setter during a late afternoon hunt on the Trinity Place Plantation.

During staunchness training, Dusty (Blue Shaquille x Snyder’s Liz, 2012) holds for the flush on Arrowhead Farms.

During staunchness training, Dusty (Blue Shaquille x Snyder’s Liz, 2012) holds for the flush on Arrowhead Farms.

Near the base of a large live oak on Arrowhead Farms, Buddy (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) locates a covey.

Near the base of a large live oak on Arrowhead Farms, Buddy (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) locates a covey.

Meanwhile back in Michigan, “Scout (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) knows where to spend  this brutally cold winter,” according to her owner Jeremy.

Meanwhile back in Michigan, “Scout (Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, 2013) knows where to spend this brutally cold winter,” writes her owner Jeremy.

Spring grouse trial dates in Minnesota & Wisconsin

Dogs, handlers, owners, judges and others at the conclusion of a derby stake held by the  MGDA in 2012.

Dogs, handlers, owners, judges and others at the conclusion of a derby stake held by the MGDA in 2012.

Grouse trials for this spring have been scheduled by the three clubs in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Trial enthusiasts should be especially excited for this year’s competition as all events were cancelled last spring due to too much snow. Let’s hope the weather cooperates this year!

Chippewa Valley Grouse Dog Association
Friday, April 4 through Sunday, April 6
Trial is held in the Eau Claire County Forest outside Stanley, Wisconsin. For further information, please contact Brent Sittlow, 952-221-3455.

Minnesota Grouse Dog Association
Friday, April 11 – Sunday, April 13 (one-hour shooting dog stakes)
Friday, April 18 – Saturday, April 19 (half-hour shooting dog stakes)
Trials are held in the Rum River State Forest outside Mora, Minnesota. For further information, please contact Greg Gress, 612-590-2353.

Moose River Grouse Dog Club
Friday, April 25 – Sunday, April 27
Trial is held in the Douglas County Forest outside Danbury, Wisconsin. For further information, please contact Sig Degitz, 715-374-2289.

For directions to each venue, click Directions to Field Trials.

The pointers of Northwoods Bird Dogs

CH Dance Smartly (CH Northern Dancer x CH Vanidestine's Rail Lady, 1991 - 1999) was our first grouse champion and the beginning of our line of pointers.

CH Dance Smartly (CH Northern Dancer x CH Vanidestine’s Rail Lady, 1991 – 1999) was our first grouse champion and the beginning of our line of pointers.

Perhaps no other breed of bird dog has had more selective breeding based solely on their performance in the field than pointers. Even so, pointers are also excellent hunting companions and house pets.

In addition to our English setters, Jerry and I always have owned pointers. We’ve bred, trained, competed and lived with them for more than 20 years and are now producing our fifth generation.

Northwoods Vixen whelped two males and seven females on April 21, 2013, by CH Elhew G Force. It can be difficult to get them all in a photograph--especially at seven weeks of age.

Eight of the nine puppies Northwoods Vixen whelped on April 21, 2013, by CH Elhew G Force at seven weeks of age.

Pointer bias
In the southern part of the country and in particular where bobwhite quail are sought, pointers far outnumber setters and other bird dogs. But in the north, there is much misinformation and bias against them. New clients, friends and others invariably ask two questions:  Don’t they run too big?  Do they make good pets?

Don’t they run too big?
This bad rap likely comes from field trial competitions where pointers dominate. Even though setter Shadow Oak Bo won the three-hour National Championship in 2013 and 2014, pointers hugely outnumber setters at the high end of horseback shooting dog and all age competition and have since the early 1900s.

Representing the third generation of pointers, Northwoods Prancer (Dashaway x Fallset Fate, whelped March 22, 2008) points with high head and confidence. Jeff Hintz moves in for the shot.

Representing the third generation of pointers, Northwoods Prancer (Dashaway x Fallset Fate, whelped March 22, 2008) points with high head and confidence. Jeff Hintz moves in for the shot. Photo by Chris Mathan.

But our pointers—whether male or female—hunt the cover at the proper distance. On the prairie, they open up but in the grouse woods or southern piney woods, they hunker down. Most importantly, our dogs handle easily and want to go with the hunter.

Do they make good pets?
Absolutely! Our pointers have two speeds—one for the field and one for the house—and they are smart enough to know the difference. Again, whether male or female, they are wonderful pets. Some traits are intangible, some tangible and others are just plain interesting.

Northwoods Vixen (CH Westfall's Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, whelped April 17, 2011) is a sweet, calm dog in the house and loves to lay in the warmth of the sun.

Northwoods Vixen (CH Westfall’s Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, whelped April 17, 2011) is a sweet, calm dog in the house and loves to lay in the warmth of the sun.

Intangible traits
•    sweet natured
•    even tempered
•    gentle
•    intelligent
•    intuitive
•    independent but never aloof

Tangible traits
•    very easy to house-break
•    rarely  bark (except to guard the house)
•    natural tendency to retrieve

Interesting traits
•    love to lay in the sun, even on a hot summer day
•    can seemingly “hold it” for hours on cold, blustery days
•    short, stiff hair is shed twice per year and can be difficult to remove from furniture and clothing

Dashaway (CH Brooks Elhew Ranger x CH Dance Smartly, 1997 - 2010) had extraordinary strength, grace, ability and personality. He represents our second generation.

Dashaway (CH Brooks Elhew Ranger x CH Dance Smartly, 1997 – 2010) had extraordinary strength, grace, ability and personality. He represents our second generation.

Beautiful, powerful, graceful, cool.
Besides endearing personalities, our pointers have all shared appearance and performance traits in the field and on point.

Our pointers are beautiful with nicely shaped heads and sharp eyes that don’t miss anything. Most are evenly masked. Some have clean white bodies while others are ticked and have body spots.

Their conformation is beautiful, too, and they move with power, strength, flair, grace and agility. On point, they are breath-taking. Posture is lofty, intense, cool and composed. Jerry and I once found Dancer, ankle-deep in snow, 20 minutes after time at a championship in Gladwin, Michigan. Even though shivering, she stood tall and staunch and had that grouse pinned.

lies have landed on fourth-generation Northwoods Vixen (CH Westfall’s Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, whelped April 17, 2011) but they don’t bother her composure and posture on point.

Flies have landed on fourth-generation Northwoods Vixen (CH Westfall’s Black Ice x Northwoods Prancer, whelped April 17, 2011) but they don’t bother her composure and posture on point.

Our line of pointers.
Jerry and I strive to breed dogs that have it all—talent, brains, personality, conformation and looks. Even though our final decisions are joint and mutually agreed on, Jerry deserves credit for masterminding our breeding program. Through travels for training and field trial competition, he has a vast network of friends in the bird dog world and talks to them often. He studies canine genetics, anatomy and personality and his stack of reading materials always includes bird dog magazines. Plus, he has a photographic memory for pedigrees.

The foundation of our pointers is the Elhew line which was conceived by the late Bob Wehle and practiced for more than 50 years.  His goal was to breed a dog that not only performed well in the field but also trained easily, had pleasing conformation and the personality to be good companions. Bob usually stayed within his line but continually looked for outcrosses that “nicked” with his dogs to improve what he had.

We also use Bob’s approach. We stay in our line with its strong Elhew background but constantly look for outside pointers that successfully nick with ours.

Pesto (CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, whelped April 21, 2013) is the fifth generation of pointers bred by Northwoods Bird Dogs. She exhibits all the best traits--style, confidence, conformation, intelligence, talent, temperament and looks.

Pesto (CH Elhew G Force x Northwoods Vixen, whelped April 21, 2013) is the fifth generation of pointers bred by Northwoods Bird Dogs. She exhibits all the best traits–style, confidence, conformation, intelligence, talent, temperament and looks.

 

Electronic training collars…a little perspective

A decades-old electronic training collar left behind by a previous dog trainer. I found it in the office of our Georgia kennel.

A decades-old electronic training collar left behind by a previous dog trainer. I found it in the office of our Georgia kennel.

That is a frightening-looking unit that seems more suitable for a Frankenstein movie than for dog training.

But that’s exactly what it is—a TX electronic training collar made by Sensitronix in 1969. I found it in the kennel office of our Georgia training grounds.

The first electronic training collars, often called shock collars, were developed in the 1950s. They were big, bulky and unreliable and could deliver only one, hot level of shock. Their primary use was to break bad habits such as chasing off-game but they were also used as a last resort to bring in a run-off. The high voltage could just as easily ruin a dog as fix a problem.

The electronic training collars of today are as different from older models as are the earliest mobile phones from current, sleek Apple and android devices. Commonly called “ecollars” now, they are extremely reliable and much smaller in size. Most provide two types of stimulation—continuous and momentary—and some offer vibration or tone options. Most importantly, the level of stimulation is highly adjustable and can be modified to the dog’s sensitivity and training situation. The lowest levels are imperceptible to most dogs.

Unfortunately, a stigma remains about the use of ecollars. Some people still believe they are cruel and prefer to train the “old-fashioned way.” Well, that quaint way incorporated some brutal treatment:  jerking a dog around on a very long check cord, dragging a dog behind a horse to bring it back where it knocked birds, using a flushing whip, throwing objects and/or peppering the dog with rat shot or 9-shot from a shotgun.

Used properly, today’s ecollars are, by far, the safest, most humane and most effective training tool available. They provide the ability to correct a dog the second it makes a mistake with the lowest level of stimulation necessary and the impersonal capability to correct a dog when working at a distance. Too, at a higher level, a dog learns it has control of the ecollar through its behavior.

As with any tool, though, an ecollar is only as good as the person wielding it. The dog must understand what is expected and must be properly introduced to ecollar stimulation. And the person still must learn the basics of dog training before using an ecollar.

Northwoods Birds Dogs    53370 Duxbury Road, Sandstone, Minnesota 55072
Jerry: 651-492-7312     |      Betsy: 651-769-3159     |           |      Directions
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